archives

ethics

This tag is associated with 19 posts

Why double pneumonia is like irregardless and why it matters

MSNBC is reporting that Rick Santorum’s daughter, Bella, has unfortunately been hospitalized again. Considering she has Trisomy 18 multiple hospitalizations are sadly expected. The article started out well enough, using the National Library of Medicine and a pediatric palliative care expert as sources and reviewing the medical issues faced by children with trisomy 18 who … Continue reading

9 states have legalized malpractice against women. Arizona hopes to be the 10th.

Prenatal testing during pregnancy is offered with the goal of identifying medical conditions that affect a fetus. Some of these medical conditions can be treated, other times knowing about the diagnosis in advance will affect how or even when the delivery occurs, and sometimes a condition is identified that leads a woman to choose an … Continue reading

With prenatal testing I’d still have 2 kidneys

In the wake of the failure of the Blunt amendment, Rick Santorum (and many of his ilk) are is still on about government and employers paying for services that Saint Santorum deems morally and religiously wrong. This of course still means contraception and prenatal testing, because apparently morally and religiously objectionable only applies to women’s … Continue reading

I just attended the worst CME lecture of my life…and what I did about it!

Yesterday concluded Pain Week, the largest pain conference in the United States (or so they said at the opening ceremonies). There were a lot of really interesting lectures, some very pertinent to my pelvic pain practice and others less so, but still interesting. For example, I don’t treat head and neck pain, but many pain … Continue reading

Poll results are in: should doctors blog and tweet anonymously?

I will be the first to admit my poll is not of the highest scientific standard. It is mere snapshot of opinions from slightly more than a handful of people. I don’t know if most who responded are doctors or not (or any other demographic for that matter as the poll was completely anonymous). It … Continue reading

Should medical professionals blog and tweet anonymously? Post and poll.

There has been a lot of controversy about anonymous medical blogs/tweets lately and I’m genuinely interested what people think. In addition, the folks at Google have jumped into the general anonymous discussion with both feet as they are not allowing anonymous accounts on G+ (which, by the way, I find too clumsy and time consuming, … Continue reading

Who should create guidelines for physicians and social media? (poll)

Doctors, Twitter, the AMA, and professionalism

The American Medical Association (AMA) appears to have appointed itself as Ministry of Morality in response to the ever growing numbers of physicians embracing social media. You may recall (you may not, but that’s why I’m here, to help you remember this kind of trivia) a recent letter in JAMA indicating that, “3% of physician … Continue reading

Blogging with integrity: what does that mean for doctors?

Once a day (but often more), a frustrated patient thrusts reams of pages downloaded from the Internet into my hands. The fact that someone researches their condition excites me, because knowledge is power. That the information they receive is often drivel, saddens me to no end. Misinformation raises false hope, causes some to make potentially … Continue reading

Recent Tweets