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evidence based medicine, Orgasm, sex, sex myths

“Squirting” during sex is urine – new study

squirtingThere has long been a controversy about female ejaculation and by this I mean large amounts of fluid or “squirting” during sexual stimulation/orgasm.

Some women lubricate very well and there are secretions from the small glands at the vaginal opening so a few milliliters of fluid is very common. But what about those videos that you see or people who report that they “squirt?” (more than 15 ml but often volumes of 100-150 ml are described).

The pro “squirting” camp believes the fluid is a form of female ejaculation and that it likely comes from the Skene’s glands, a pair of glands on either side of the urethra (the tube that drains the bladder). The Skene’s glands are referred to by some as the “female prostate.”

This idea of “squirting” being ejaculate from the Skene’s glands or other lower genital tract glands has long bothered me as the Skene’s glands are tiny, about the size of a pea, and are just not physiologically capable of producing any more than a few milliliters of fluid at best. Keep in mind the male prostate is about the size of a walnut, so much larger than Skene’s glands, and only produces 3-5 ml of ejaculate. In fact there is no single gland in the genital tract capable of producing 15 mls or more of fluid in a short period of time never mind 100 mls. In fact, I’m not sure there is any single gland (or a pair of glands) anywhere in the body capable of churning out 100 ml of liquid in an hour or less.

This new study, The Nature and Original of “Squirting” in Female Sexuality in the Journal of Sexual Medicine evaluated seven healthy women who reported female ejaculation or “squirting”, i.e. the emission of a large amount of fluid during orgasm. They were screened to make sure they did not have a history of incontinence. The women then emptied their bladders, were stimulated to orgasm either by themselves (2 women) with a toy or with a sex partner (5 women, male partners used condoms to prevent fluid contamination) and a variety of measurements were obtained:

  • Amount of urine in the bladder at baseline, while aroused, and after orgasm (measured by ultrasound)
  • Urine was collected and analyzed before stimulation and after orgasm
  • The “squirted” fluid was analyzed

Urine and squirted fluid was analyzed for chemicals (BUN, creatinine, uric acid, and prostate specific antigen or PSA) to determine whether the fluid was urine or from a gland like the Skene’s.

So what did the researchers find? In these women who reported “squirting” their bladders filled remarkably fast during sexual stimulation and so contained urine pre orgasm/”squirting” and was empty after “squirting.” Biochemically the fluid retrieved from “squirting” was urine although small amounts of PSA were detected meaning a small amount of fluid may come from the Skene’s glands. This finding is expected because the glands are mechanically stimulated during arousal and/or because they secrete small amounts of fluid during excitement and possibly orgasm.

An empty bladder before sex that fills during arousal and is then empty after “squirting,” in addition to the biochemical analysis, confirms the fluid is urine. This is not surprising given there is no gland that can produce a large amount of fluid in the area and the stimulation of sexual activity combined with the pelvic floor muscle contractions of orgasm could cause the bladder to empty involuntarily. Whether women who report “squirting” actually have an incontinence issue or whether the have stronger pelvic floor contractions is unknown.

What happens during sex doesn’t really matter as long as you are having fun. However, this study is important because many women feel inadequate because they don’t “squirt.” In fact, I am asked about this a couple of times a month. Yes, there are small emissions from Skene’s glands (a few ml at best) and likely the Bartholin’s glands, but this is not in the volume that women who “squirt” describe and certainly wouldn’t be expelled in the way women describe “squirting.”

Wet spots are the norm and are a combination of vaginal fluid and emissions from the Skene’s and Bartholin’s glands, but large amounts of fluid that are “squirted” during sex are urine. If it makes a woman or her partner feel like she has achieved a stronger orgasm, then great. If it is bothersome, then seeing a urogynecologist (bladder specialist) may help determine the type of coital incontinence (the technical term for involuntary bladder emptying during sex) and what treatment might be available.

“Squirting” is not female ejaculation it is the involuntary release of urine. Whether “squirting” should be a goal during sex is really personal, but it is important to be precise because there are already so many sex myths out there and a million reasons for women to feel inadequate.

 

Discussion

49 thoughts on ““Squirting” during sex is urine – new study

    • I wonder if the rapidly filling bladder is caused by the outsource of fluid caused by edema brought on by sexual stimulation. I am a squirter, but I assure you, this is not close to smell nor acidity of urine. For me it seems to as ccompany multiple orgasms.

      Posted by shykori | December 15, 2015, 8:52 pm
  1. I’m not in any way surprised by this study. The idea that the microscopic Skene’s paraurethral glands could produce gallons of squirt has always struck me as ridiculous. No gland can do this, because it needs a reservoir to store the secretions. It’s always seemed to me to be an urban myth, one propagated by producers of low quality porn.

    Skene described his eponymous glands in the mid 19th century, It was just beginning to be recognised then that all embryos begin as female, but that some change into male—the significance of the Y chromosome was unappreciated then; and, similarly ontogenetic embryonic development as an idea was just developing, even though much of the work was later found to have been faked. So, the search was on for residual female bits in the male, and vice-versa. And voilá, Skene’s glands were so “obviously” the female equivalent of the male prostate. Likewise, the prostatic utricle was obviously the male vagina.

    Apart from the urinary bladder, the only organ I can think of that might “squirt” 100mls at a time is the normally functioning gallbladder. And that certainly isn’t a gland.

    Posted by korhomme | January 10, 2015, 11:41 am
  2. Well, that’s incredibly disrespectful to have a bunch of women brought to orgasm for the sake of “science”. It’s not only immoral but also sociopathic. Sexual molesters is what these scientists are. Sex is supposed to be something meaningful and sacred.

    Posted by Matthew | January 13, 2015, 9:46 am
  3. I knew it!!! I knew it!!! Thank you!

    I am sick and tired of this squirting BS.

    Posted by Julia | January 17, 2015, 5:30 pm
    • Julia, this is really happening and no BS at all. Best proof is try for yourself. I’m 34 and just discovered this phenomenon, experienced it twice last week after reading tutorials online LOL. Definitely not pee. May come from the bladder though, but not pee…

      Try it for yourself! This is your best option!

      Posted by Marie | August 9, 2016, 9:23 am
  4. The sample size is tiny, but I’m certainly willing to believe the findings.

    However, and this is anecdotal of course but I’m curious, people who squirt (and their partners) can tell you that extremely close examination of “squirted” fluid makes the difference between it and normal urine extremely clear–literally. The “ejaculate” (or sexually-stimulated urine, whatever) is markedly different in color, smell, and taste than urine examined immediately before or after the “squirt” has occurred. I mean “examined” in the layman’s sense. “Female ejaculate” is almost always clear, smells far more like other sexual fluids rather than ammonia/urine (in fact it does not smell of urine any more than semen does, which is to say, very slightly), and so on. Which is why the debate has raged for so long. If it smelled, looked and tasted like urine, no one would have ever thought of it as a different substance.

    So what could be going on in those bladders during sex? You mention the study found that empty bladders filled “remarkably fast”, which is the experience of women who “squirt”: even after peeing directly before sex, the pressure of “ejaculate” builds in precisely the same way the pressure of semen does. It can, if not released, create an uncomfortable or painful feeling of “blue balls”, despite there not being a large amount of actual urine released when they go to the toilet to urinate (non sexually). Is this pressure just a result of the pelvic tissues engorging and the pelvic floor muscles flexing during sexual response? Why are their bladders “filling quickly”, what does “quickly” mean in this case, and what would cause such a response? Really interested in any speculation you might have.

    Also, and this is addressed to both you and your commentators: while the hubbub over “squirting” and the resulting feelings of inadequacy by people who were unable to do it has been awful, it is just as bad to pathologize people who can/do “squirt”. For many people it is not “BS”, it is entirely normal and enjoyed by all parties involved, and medical/personal shame associated with “urination” should be kept the heck away from women’s sex lives (unless they’re into shame, of course!).

    Posted by Lynn Barthol | January 27, 2015, 11:22 pm
    • In the study the squirted fluid was essentially identical to urine (it contained things than an ejaculate could not). It may be very dilute urine as the bladders filled quickly. With squirting there will be some mixture with vaginal secretions and so there may be some minimal differences in taste etc.

      The fact is there is no gland that is capable of doing what women report when they squirt and so the term ejaculation is not precise. A full bladder and tense pelvic muscle pre-orgasm may give the feeling that something needs to be released, but many women who do not report squirting report identical sensations.

      If more than a few mls of fluid comes out with squirting then it has to be urine. Whether this represents a stronger orgasm or women and their partners find it satisfying will always be a personal thing, as are most things with sex. If a woman and her partner think squirting is definitive proof that something good happened, great. If it bothers a woman then she should speak with her GYN about options.

      It’s not a pathology either way, it’s just urine that is coming out because of a combination of quick bladder filling and a robust pelvic floor contraction. The issue that I see in my practice is women who feel less than adequate because their partners show them porn and insist it is some kind of secret ejaculate and why can’t they do that? If women are content with how their body is working then squirting wouldn’t come up in conversation.

      No one should judge anyone. If the people involved are happy that’s all that matters.

      Posted by Dr. Jen Gunter | January 27, 2015, 11:39 pm
      • Sounds like your clients need better boyfriends who have had it carefully explained to them that porn is theater, and that squirting in porn is just as staged as the rest of it. But again, I’d love to hear your speculation on why the baldders are filling rapidly and why the subjective experience of “squirting” is for so many women, entirely different from normal urination both in perception of the substance produced and in sensation. Specifically, why is sex-urine so markedly different from normal urine?

        Posted by Lynn Barthol | January 29, 2015, 10:19 am
      • I have experienced this with one partner in particular and him only. We were together for 2 years and every time we had sex this would happen. I can tell you that I don’t know where the fluid came from but I can say that it was not urine. It doesn’t smell like or look like urine. It does smell musky or has a musk like smell. There were times when we would have a “sex marathon” that would last for around 6 hours. He would like to do this to see how many times he could make me “squirt” and I believe our record was 30 times to his 10. I understand and am glad that a study was even done but I also hope that there will be more studies in order to have a definitive answer.

        Posted by Lisa T | December 17, 2015, 5:58 am
      • Aside from Matthew’s comment accusing the doctors of molesting the women, I’ve really liked just about everything else I’ve read in the comments posted. With every comment, I felt the desire to give a hug and thank them for being so open, honest and cool. Thank you, to everyone who left comments. I haven’t read them all yet but this seems like the most well rounded, awesome group of people for whom I’ve come in contact with online. The readers here are reason enough for me to register to the site just so I can look forward to reading more of what the readers have to offer.
        Btw, I’ve never squirted but I do notice that my bladder fills quickly during stimulation and that the only other feeling I’ve experienced besides a clitoral orgasm is the feeling that I’m going to pee myself unless I pause the intercourse until I’ve run to the bathroom and emptied my bladder (again)

        Posted by Susan | July 1, 2016, 2:08 am
      • In other studies, such as Gary Schubach (August 2001). “Urethral Expulsions During Sensual Arousal and Bladder Catheterization in Seven Human Females”, findings are the liquid does come from the bladder, but has different composition.

        It’s not because it comes out of the bladder that it is urine. The bladder is a mere container. Until the exact composition and source of this liquid is found, why name it urine ? This serves only the purpose of shaming squirters.

        Urine is a waste product, this clearly is not.

        Also certainly, urine and this liquid mix sometimes. Hence the confusion maybe

        Posted by Marie | August 9, 2016, 9:32 am
    • Yes. Everything about this post. Yes! I think the bladder is filling because of sexual stimulation. So it’s still not regular urination. I also thought about that shaming bit. All very well said.

      Posted by Kelly | May 5, 2016, 8:10 pm
  5. What urine smells or looks like is pretty damn dependent on how concentrated it is, and what food and drink have recently been ingested. I’ve often wondered whether the fluid people talk about was urine, and they just didn’t recognize it because it was so ‘diluted’ and didn’t have a smell of its own.

    Posted by Kerlyssa | January 28, 2015, 3:22 am
    • Simply and accurately put! I myself am a “squirter” and I will be the first person to admit and entertain the idea that copious amounts of fluid emitted at orgasm are predominantly urine. For me, most often there is NOT the distinctive urine/ammonia odor but as I have gotten older an less “fit”, there have been many times that a noticeable outline of the area beneath and in front of me once it has dried. Having said that, I will also say that I do NOT think that “female ejaculation” is a myth and that many times there is a combination of ejaculate and urine,

      A decade or so ago when I was a year or two experienced in bringing myself to orgasm AND experiencing the release of fluid, I “squirted” and it WAS ejaculate. Granted, it was not copious, but it propelled across the room as far as 6 feet…I know, my laptop was 2+ feet away from my vagina and the television was 6 or 7 feet away- Both of which I had to clean up. The consistency was that of a male’s pre-seminal fluid and that is based upon not only what remained in my vagina but the emissions I had to wipe up. Amazed and curious at this newfound experience, I recall using my finger to dab the numerous dots of fluid that landed on my computer and ty before cleaning it and was convinced and relived that it was NOT urine when it formed a “string” as I pulled my finger away from the spots, not to mention the greasy, oily, slippery feel it had. (Sorry about my choice of adjectives-lol).

      In recent years, my emissions have become more copious and with less propulsion and as stated from the get go…predominantly urine. . Many may think of “squirting” as a goal to reach,while others find it offensive and embarrassing. Either way, if it happens upon climaxing…WHO GIVES A SHIT? Whether you are the woman who releases fluid or the partner who may have helped them get there…It should be considered pleasurable. I can’t think of any reason why the scientific make up of the fluid would have a negative affect upon what happened….SHE CLIMAXED!

      Posted by comfortablynumb | August 21, 2016, 8:28 am
  6. Are we really to make scientific conclusions based on a study so small?

    Posted by Stephanie Lynn Tanner | January 28, 2015, 12:14 pm
  7. Squirter here. Yep, it’s pee all right — or close enough that it doesn’t make a difference. Rapidly filling bladder, check. Strong pelvic contractions, check. Pee smell, check.

    It’s involuntary like a yawn is. It’s something that I consciously do, unlike my heartbeat, but I [almost] have to do it.

    When I first started having intercourse my partner thought I was squirting and having vaginal orgasms but I flatly denied it and had no perception of what he was talking about at all. As far as I was concerned I had only clitoral orgasms which were masculine, sneeze-like and final. In my thirties I did kegels for slight stress incontinence which they did nothing for, but I started to become aware of also having multiple vaginal orgasms and of squirting. At that time squirting was something I had a choice about and in any case only happened with penetration. In my forties squirting became completely involuntary even without penetration, making receiving oral sex difficult unless my partner had a certain sort of kink. At fifty I no longer distinguish between my clitoral and vaginal orgasms — it’s all multiple, all squirty all the time.

    Subjectively I don’t feel that the change has to do with a weakening pelvic floor but with stronger, more directed contractions and a stronger urge to bear down.

    My theory is not that it’s incontinence but that evolution has given us an extra source of lube for those times when you just want to keep going and going. (An evo-psych just-so story off the top of my head might be that it’s associated with a shift towards monogamy and a female wanting to keep a male partner completely worn out so that he wouldn’t be running around, but I’m absolutely not attached to that.)

    I understand why squirters don’t want to feel incontinent and I agree that we aren’t, but I don’t see what the point of insisting that It’s Not Pee! is.

    Posted by Opacity | January 28, 2015, 2:14 pm
  8. Also: yes, I know that Masters & Johnson proved that vaginal and clitoral orgasms are the same thing. The fact is though that subjectively I have experienced them differently. Any thoughts on that?

    Posted by Opacity | January 28, 2015, 2:17 pm
    • I don’t know anyone personally who experiences them as the same, and I certainly do not. Ditto orgasms caused by other stimuli: breast/nipple, anal, feet, and orgasms caused by dreams without physical stimulus. All have distinct sensations in different parts of our anatomy.

      Since findings have gone both ways since this has been studied, I expect findings will continue to oscillate for a decade at least. I sure am tired of being told my subjective experiences are objectively “incorrect” or “the same”.

      I’m guessing the differences can be chalked up to neurology, which of course varies fairly drastically from person to person.

      Posted by Lynn Barthol | January 29, 2015, 10:22 am
  9. Dr Jen thank you for the objective well organized information. I am a physician and avid orgasm enthusiast. I have met a few women over the years who “squirt” with orgasm. Several of these women were Tantra practitioners (see amrita). I did find it interesting how sweet the ejected urine was despite no history of diabetes. I am unaware of any ducts joining the short female urethra only the Skene’s ducts near the meatus. An interesting follow up study would be to measure serum & urine glucose levels in squirters or to determine if the sympathetic autonomic response of orgasm causes a transient hyperglycemic state. Elevated GFR with vigorus sex could account for the rapid filling of the bladder. In any case, my sexual partners who “ejaculate” do seem to be having very intense orgasms with the associated involuntary pelvic floor muscular contractions. Thanks again for your rational discussion and approach.

    Posted by Brian Williams | August 22, 2015, 11:56 am
  10. Great. It’s urine. Well that stinks. Not literally. It actually smells like nothing and has different flavors, just like male ejaculate. But I was hoping it wasn’t urine.

    Posted by andshewasandstillis | September 5, 2015, 3:11 pm
    • Well now that I know this I won’t let my buddy make me “squirt” anymore. Actually now I’m very embarrassed. Maybe I should send him these findings and never talk to him again. All this time I thought I was doing something else. Some part of me was unsure, which is why I looked this up.

      Posted by noMoreSexForMe | October 7, 2015, 11:25 am
      • It’s sort of urine. It’s fluid produced by the kidneys by quickly filtering blood, but urine is only produced as a waste product and has no other function. ‘Ejaculate’ is an end-product produced during sex to lubricate, to flush out the urethra and to spread pheromones. (Well, I imagine those are its functions. It may have others.)

        It may or may not even smell like pee. One of my boyfriends doesn’t wash his sheets after I’ve visited because they smell so strongly of sex — not pee! — that he gets a buzz.

        It doesn’t make sense to call it incontinence when it’s so clearly different from peeing or from leaking when you laugh. Sort of like breathing, laughing, talking, coughing, sneezing and yawning all involve expelling air from the lungs, but they aren’t the same thing.

        Posted by Alison Cummins | October 7, 2015, 11:55 am
      • Nomoresexforme, Alison Cummins’ reply is as great as her nickname. My wife squirts, and sometimes it does smell like urine. Most of the times it doesn’t, and sometimes it is outright delicious – the taste is very much like my own precum. But the fact that it is similar to urine chemically does not mean it can possibly be called “incontinence”: this would imply that women that squirt are uncapable of containing urine, when what they’re doing is actually the complete opposite. They are looking to squirt. How the fuck is that incontinence? As for “true female ejaculation”, it sounds not only stupid but inaccurate. To “ejaculate” is to “dart out”, and according to this rather clumsy attempt at separating Skene’s secretions from the content of squirt, the whitish, thick fluid that makes up female “ejaculation” is actually not expelled or darted out, but rather oozes out. Comparisons are as unclear as they are unnecessary, but a parallelism with males would be preseminal or Cowper’s fluid.

        Squirting orgasms are different from everything else. I think the science is just starting to look into it, but trying to dismiss it as “incontinence” looks to me like another blow by the sexually repressed, always attempting to push anything that looks like sexually liberating under the rug, rather than trying to explain as obviously and exclusively a sexual practice as one can think of.

        If I were you, I would continue squirting. I will continue to enjoy my wife’s squirt, its chemical composition notwithstanding.

        Posted by Miguel | April 22, 2016, 8:19 am
      • This:

        “Alison Cummins on October 7, 2015 at 11:55 am

        It’s sort of urine. It’s fluid produced by the kidneys by quickly filtering blood, but urine is only produced as a waste product and has no other function. ‘Ejaculate’ is an end-product produced during sex…”

        The study that claims it is “identical” to urine but the chemical components they test for are limited and they don’t even test for ammonia. “Female ejaculate” rushes into a previously empty bladder, contains orders or magnitudes more PSA (prostate protein contained in male ejaculate) and looks and smells nothing like the urine that was expelled right before sex. As Alison said above, unwashed “ejaculate” sheets smell like sweet sex, while pee sheets reek like urine. Female “ejaculate” may have much of the same chemical makeup, come through the bladder, and even contain trace amounts of urine left in the bladder, but it is not the same thing as urine.

        Posted by Jessica Smith | July 27, 2016, 11:03 am
      • It’s a great thing speaking from a males point if view, I’m sure your partner would love to know the facts, and you definitely shouldn’t be embarrassed by it.

        Posted by Bd | August 28, 2016, 8:19 am
  11. my question is i’m male and was incontinent because of prostate problems but had an artificial sphincter put in when thy did the penial implant and when i climax i squirt a small amount of urine i know urine is sterile but if i have a uti i’v been told the infection can’t be spread to the vagina please email me thanks

    Posted by Fred grenier | November 15, 2015, 6:47 am
  12. Hello Dr. Gunter,

    This study is extremely interesting! I have a question for you since you seem to be an expert in the subject.

    I always empty my bladder before masturbating, and do often squirt. Once I got it into my mind that it wasn’t “pee,” I was able to release it during intercourse with my boyfriend. It seems, though, that I could only reach this intense climax with him in the mornings when I had a semi-full bladder. It added a certain pressure that made it easier to release. Your study explains this! But let me get to my question…

    The past two mornings I’ve had intercourse with my boyfriend and felt the urge to squirt, but was unable to reach climax and release the building pressure. Afterwards, it’s been extremely uncomfortable to urinate (a sort of tickling pressure.) Throughout the rest of the day I constantly feel the need to urinate, yet my bladder seems to be empty. I feel certain that it’s because I let the fluid build up and was unable to release it during intercourse, but I’m not sure how to relieve myself now. I imagine it’s what blue balls for men might feel like, but I can’t find anything about a female equivalent of it on the Internet.

    I’m also wondering if you can explain why it feels so separate from my bladder (as if it’s in a separate “sex fluid” compartment) when I try to urinate, but gives the same uncomfortable sensation that I need to. Also, I’ve had this problem in the past and been checked out for a UTI, but never had one. I’m pretty sure it must come back to the female ejaculation. What are your thoughts?

    Thank you so much for your time!

    Kathleen

    Posted by Kathleen | December 9, 2015, 7:46 am
  13. Thanks for calling B/S on this one. Looking at a couple of youporn videos, I always thought “squirting” fans were really just closeted “Golden Shower” aficionados. Hey, if you like that, have a ball. For me, it’s gross. I prefer not to be peed on, Thanks. But then, I’m squeamish. Ha!

    Posted by Jim Christian | January 6, 2016, 8:55 am
  14. Definitely an author that has never been able to squirt during sex. Call it what you will but it is real and if you haven’t done it then you haven’t reached a level of pleasure for both parties that is well beyond a typical orgasm. So sorry that this void in your life has driven you to denounce it as something bad. RIP you pathetic soul.

    Posted by Finn Flannigan | March 12, 2016, 10:20 am
    • Just an author who has operated on the lower genital tract thousands of times in addition to dissections in anatomy lab who knows there is no structure able to produce any significant volume of fluid except the bladder. And a physician who read a good article on the subject.

      Posted by Dr. Jen Gunter | March 13, 2016, 7:18 pm
    • I agree with Finn Flannigan. People who don’t ‘believe’ it have not experienced it first hand. There is releasing urine during climax and there is female ‘ejaculating.’ They both go through the bladder and ejaculate may even contain trace amounts of urine accordingly, it may be made up of many of the same chemical components, but it is not a waste product that stinks like urine, not even diluted urine — it is a sweet smelling completely clear liquid that never turns. It gushes into an empty bladder during climax and contains orders of magnitude greater amounts of prostate proteins (PSA like male ejaculate) and if it isn’t expelled right when this happens you are left unsatisfied and very uncomfortable in the pelvis, like “blue balls,” very different from holding urine. Incontinence, by the way, has nothing to do with it. Maybe for someone who actually pees, but not this. Seven is not a sample size to draw scientific conclusions from and they didn’t even test for ammonia, which is NOT present in female ejaculate.

      “In Tantra, this liquid is called “Amrita” which means something like “divine nectar”. The tantrics consider that sexual energy is transformed into liquid which is expelled from a woman’s vagina.” I think the tantrics are having better sex than these scientists, what do you think?

      Posted by Jessica Smith | July 27, 2016, 11:41 am
      • The thing is there is no gland in the lower female reproductive tract capable of producing large amounts of fluid in a very short period of time, i.e. something that could squirt. I know this because I have operated in the area on hundreds if not thousands of women. If there were a hidden gland we would know.

        The main point, if sex feels good and you are having an orgasm great. If you release fluid and when that happens you feel better. Great. It is highly plausible that stronger orgasms empty the bladder thus given the appearance of squirting and the pleasure. We do know that pelvic floor contractions, i.e. orgasm, can empty the bladder. The bladder emptying is more biologically plausible than a hidden gland that no gynecologist has found.

        However, at the end of the day if you are having fun that is all that matters

        Posted by Dr. Jen Gunter | August 5, 2016, 7:00 am
  15. basing on the human anatomy and physiology the evidence seems true but still wonder why some guys love it alot?

    Posted by NO winny | June 12, 2016, 5:53 am
  16. I think it is pee too. Diluted pee, definitely.Sometimes a bit sweet too. It mostly happens to me during fingering and not penetration.However the problem is that I DO NOT ORGASM while squirting😦

    All my orgasms come via the clitoris, and I think it is completely normal (clitoris being analogous to penis and all). However, when the G spot (which I think is a fancy term for urethral sponge) is stimulated I get an overwhelming urge to pee, and then comes the waterworks, unaccompanied by the big O. Basically, it is just a nuisance😦 Is there any way I can stop it? I sometimes worry I’ve urinary incontinence.

    Also, if I reduce the pressure applied on the G spot, can I get away without the pee saga? I ask because it is a rare occurrence during penetrative sex for me but a regular occurrence during fingering.

    Posted by curvyisashape | July 2, 2016, 10:48 pm
  17. am suprise that squirting is urine becouse urine does not dry within an houre but squirting dry very fast

    Posted by martha | July 6, 2016, 2:16 pm
  18. I always thought they must be releasing urine, too.

    Just wanted to point out that there IS a set of glands in the body that can produce well in excess of 100ml of fluid in an hour, and those are the mammary glands. This is in response to your comment that you’re not sure whether any gland in the whole body could produce so much fluid in an hour.

    Posted by Tara | July 13, 2016, 3:26 pm
    • An individual milk producing unit in the breast is called a simple mammary gland or lactiferous duct and while I don’t know for sure I’d guess a single duct cannot produce 100 ml/hour. The entire collection of simple mammary glands can of course, but the apples to apples would be a simple mammary gland.

      Posted by Dr. Jen Gunter | July 13, 2016, 3:31 pm
  19. So after making my girlfriend squirt for her frsit time she feel a little more open lest say.. is that normal?

    Posted by Markus | July 31, 2016, 6:07 pm
  20. for one thing the male prostrate does not control the volume of ejacute of the male… the testes do the prostrate is a valve between the testes and the bladder

    Posted by Warren Searfoss | August 3, 2016, 8:57 am
  21. Simply and accurately put! I myself am a “squirter” and I will be the first person to admit and entertain the idea that copious amounts of fluid emitted at orgasm are predominantly urine. For me, most often there is NOT the distinctive urine/ammonia odor but as I have gotten older an less “fit”, there have been many times that a noticeable outline of the area beneath and in front of me once it has dried. Having said that, I will also say that I do NOT think that “female ejaculation” is a myth and that many times there is a combination of ejaculate and urine,

    A decade or so ago when I was a year or two experienced in bringing myself to orgasm AND experiencing the release of fluid, I “squirted” and it WAS ejaculate. Granted, it was not copious, but it propelled across the room as far as 6 feet…I know, my laptop was 2+ feet away from my vagina and the television was 6 or 7 feet away- Both of which I had to clean up. The consistency was that of a male’s pre-seminal fluid and that is based upon not only what remained in my vagina but the emissions I had to wipe up. Amazed and curious at this newfound experience, I recall using my finger to dab the numerous dots of fluid that landed on my computer and ty before cleaning it and was convinced and relived that it was NOT urine when it formed a “string” as I pulled my finger away from the spots, not to mention the greasy, oily, slippery feel it had. (Sorry about my choice of adjectives-lol).

    In recent years, my emissions have become more copious and with less propulsion and as stated from the get go…predominantly urine. . Many may think of “squirting” as a goal to reach,while others find it offensive and embarrassing. Either way, if it happens upon climaxing…WHO GIVES A SHIT? Whether you are the woman who releases fluid or the partner who may have helped them get there…It should be considered pleasurable. I can’t think of any reason why the scientific make up of the fluid would have a negative affect upon what happened….SHE CLIMAXED!

    Posted by comfortablynumb | August 21, 2016, 8:43 am

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